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Posts By: Anthony Rizzo

SFMOMA Reopening Celebrates Graphic Design

Posted by & filed under Print Advertising, Typography.

SFMOMA reopened last month. Exciting! Of its 170,000 square feet — the architecture firm Snøhetta integrated a 10-story expansion with the original Mario Botta building — 3,500 square feet are devoted to architecture and design, including modern and contemporary architecture, furniture, product and graphic design. I was delighted to be able to visit two weeks ago and see “Typeface to Interface: Graphic Design from the Collection,” one of 19 special exhibitions on view.

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— Full blog by Ellen Shapiro originally appeared in Print Magazine.

In Space We Trust

Posted by & filed under HTML + CSS, Infographic, Typography.

To boldly go where no web developer has gone before! I’m a huge sucker for space and In Space We Trust is next-level website inspiration. It’s a video-game-infographic-interactive-typographically-awesome timeline of landmark happenings in the world of space exploration. Even if you don’t swoon over Sputnik or moon over the moon like I do, check out this graphic masterpiece. You’ll learn something and come away dreaming of the design work. Plus, you can download some of the imagery as wallpapers.

Discover Pharell Williams Through His Fans

Posted by & filed under HTML + CSS.

Those of you who attended HOW Design Live 2016 remember the incredible blend of music, culture, design and community that’s wholly entwined with Pharrell Williams’ work. You’ll find the same vibe on his website, which not only features a uniquely-tiled user interface, smooth animations and—naturally—great music, but also invites a sense of community and creativity. You can create a “fan card,” each of which represents a fan’s favorite project from the worlds of music, TV & film, social good, art & design, and fashion. Be sure to visit his site, even add a tile to the user experience.

10 Beautiful Projects for Packaging Design Inspiration

Posted by & filed under Brand Marketing, Corporate Identity, Typography.

Have you received your copy of Print’s 2015 Regional Design Annual? Surely I don’t have to remind you that it’s the design industry’s most well-respected and sought-after annual? In it, you’ll find 348 of the best American designs of the year, including the beautiful packaging designs you’ll see here courtesy of HOW Magazine:

Brooks Dry Cider

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Hall, Oakland, CA; www.toshhall.com: Tosh Hall (creative director/art director/designer/writer), Luke Dixon (illustrator), Mathew Coluccio, Andy Baron (photographers); Brooks Bennett (client)

Gershwin CD

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Starbucks Global Creative Studio, Seattle; www.starbucks.com: Mike Peck, Jeffrey Fields (creative directors), Jon Cannell (art director), Dana Deininger (designer), Steven Stolder (writer); Starbucks Coffee Company (client)

Krave Jerky for Whole Foods

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Hatch Design, San Francisco; www.hatchsf.com: Joel Templin, Katie Jain (creative directors/art directors), Will Ecke, Eszter Clark, Javier Garcia (designers), Sarah Remington (photographer), Lisa Pemrick (writer); Krave Jerky (client)

Swell Cold Brew Bottle

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pprwrk studio, Kapolei, HI; www.pprwrkstudio.com: Mark Caneso (creative director/art director/designer); Swell Cold Co-op (client)

Frisco City Grainworks Packaging System

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RBMM, Dallas; www.rbmm.com: Jeff Barfoot (creative director), Garrett Owen (art director/designer); Frisco City Grainworks (client)

Xylobags Packaging

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70kft, Dallas; www.70kft.com: Stefan Reddick (creative director/designer), Michael Feavel (art director/designer); Xylobags (client)

Fest Cola Packaging

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CPR and Partners, New Orleans; www.cprandpartners.com: David Caruso, Rocky Russo (creative directors/art directors/designers), Justin Bonura (creative director/writer); Fest Cola (client)

Good Brewing Company Can Design

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Lewis Communications, Birmingham, AL; www.lewiscommunications.com: Roy Burns (creative director/art director/designer), Andrew Thompson (art director/ designer); Good People Brewing Company (client)

Agave Dream

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Hiebing, Madison, WI; www.hiebing.com: Sean Mullen (creative director), Barry Kalpinski (art director/designer), Sandy Geier (writer); Agave Dream (client)

Yokan Packaging

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Yoko Nire Studio; www.yokonire.com: Yoko Nire (creative director/art director/designer), Jason Booher, Katarzyna Gruda (instructors); B.S. Network, Japan (client)

Iconic Designer Susan Kare Explains How ⌘ Came to Be

Posted by & filed under Think Tank, Typography.

 

The trash can. The pouring paint bucket. The disc. The happy Mac (or sad one). Susan Kare designed them all. In creating these and most of the other icons on the original Apple Macintosh, she established the framework for modern visual communications: The Point-and-Click Era. Here, Kare, icon of icons, talks about the creative decisions behind some of the best-loved symbols of the past four decades.

Kare delivered this presentation at last year’s Layers Design Conference in San Francisco, but the video was only recently posted online. It’s full of fresh observations about the creative process, insights about her time at Apple, and advice for designing with accessibility in mind; so even if you’re familiar with Kare and her work, I’m willing to bet you’ll find something new here. I learned from Kare’s 2013 book, for example, that the command icon (⌘) was originally a symbol used to denote interesting features at Swedish campgrounds, but the story of how she stumbled upon the symbol in the first place, and how she weighed its merits at the time. (Her description of her first trip to Sweden, decades after she copped the command icon for Apple, is also pretty damn charming.)

Her talk’s about half an hour long and well worth watching in its entirety. The second half of the video, a Q&A between Kare and Daring Fireball’s John Gruber, is also worth a watch.

How to Live Like a Creative

Posted by & filed under Infographic.

I’ve never been one to enjoy the word “creative” as a noun but so seems to be the trend of the decade. It might be best to just accept the titles we receive and apply the definition in our work and not just our daily lives. About that: the daily life of a creative person. This wonderful infographic explores what it’s like to spend a day in the shoes of a ‘creative’.

View the interactive infographic or download it, the old-fashioned way.

Hayao Miyazaki and the Essence of Humanity in Animation

Posted by & filed under Brand Marketing, Think Tank.

 

Sometimes, people call the filmmaker Hayao Miyazaki the “Japanese Walt Disney” (even though he’s said to hate it). In his 40-year career, Miyazaki has created such films as Castle in the Sky, Kiki’s Delivery Service, Howl’s Moving Castle, and Spirited Away. In this 17-minute video essay, Lewis Bond takes us through Miyazaki’s genius and how he excels at bringing three-dimensional characters to his two-dimensional films. “His aim wasn’t to make films that spoke down to children. His aim was to make films that would help us all understand the human condition,” Bond says. Video essays like this and more of Bond’s work can be found on his YouTube channel.

— Video by Lewis Bond, originally appeared in The Atlantic Videos.

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The Pirelli Calendar 2016

Posted by & filed under Brand Marketing, Corporate Identity, Print Advertising.

The special “art item” calendar released by the Italian tire company, Pirelli, each year has a unique twist coming in 2016. Typically filled with photographs of nude or scantily clad women, this year’s editions, shot by V.F. contributing photographer Annie Leibovitz, features 12 studio portraits of women renowned for their work in diverse fields—including comedy, sports, philanthropy, and art. Another notable departure from the Pirelli ‘brand’ is that Leibovitz is the only woman — aside from husband-and-wife duo Inez and Vinoodh, in 2007 — to have photographed the calendar in over 25 years.

Of all the accomplished women featured — Serena Williams; Yao Chen; Patti Smith; Amy Schumer; Yoko Ono; investor Mellody Hobson; Fran Lebowitz; Agnes Gund and her granddaughter; director Ava DuVernay; artist Shirin Neshat; producer Kathleen Kennedy; blogger and actress Tavi Gevinson; model Natalia Vodianova and one of her young children — only Williams and Schumer are shown in their underwear.

Check out the entire project at Pirelli Calendar

America’s First Political Cartoons

Posted by & filed under Think Tank.

We’re roughly a year away from elections and it may be argued that the political season is in full swing for the 2016 race. It just felt right for me to scour the web and find an interesting collection of America’s first political cartoons that graced the pages of Puck magazine, America’s first satirical magazine to portray politics and social issues of the day.

 

The Modern Collossus of (Rail) Roads

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Illustration shows William Henry Vanderbilt, president of the New York Central Railroad and several other railroads, Cyrus West Field, of the New York Elevated Railroad Company, and Jay Gould, of the Union Pacific Railroad and other western railroads.

Year: 1879

 

The Duty of the Hour

Frying-Pan

Print shows a female figure labeled “Cuba” holding the Cuban flag, caught in a frying pan labeled “Spanish Misrule” that is being held above flames labeled “Anarchy” raging between fighting factions labeled “Insurgents” on the left and “Autonomists” on the right, on the island of Cuba.

Year: 1898

 

The King of the Combinations

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Illustration shows John D. Rockefeller wearing a huge crown and robe, standing on an oil storage tank labeled “Standard Oil”, and glaring at the viewer. The crown is adorned with railroad cars, oil tanks, and the names of four railroad companies: “Lehigh Valley R.R., St. Paul R.R., Jersey Central R.R., [and] Reading Rail Road”, and topped with a dollar sign “$”.

Year: 1901

 

The Central Bank

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Illustration shows a gigantic J. Pierpont Morgan clutching to his chest with his right arm large New York City buildings labeled “Billion Dollar Bank Merger”; in the foreground, a young child puts a coin in a “Toy Bank” as Morgan’s left arm reaches around the buildings to grab the toy bank for himself.

Caption: Why should Uncle Sam establish one, when Uncle Pierpont is already on the job?

Year: 1910

 

The Awakening

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Illustration shows a torch-bearing female labeled “Votes for Women”, symbolizing the awakening of the nation’s women to the desire for suffrage, striding across the western states, where women already had the right to vote, toward the east where women are reaching out to her. Printed below the cartoon is a poem by Alice Duer Miller.

Year: 1915